The post-election Government must start listening to business

confusing signpostAs if the post-EU referendum uncertainty wasn’t enough, businesses now must contend with a Government that is far less “strong and stable” than it was before the General Election.

Portcullis Public Affairs, of which I am a shareholder and chairman, is a specialist consultancy advising businesses on government and strategic communications.  It has an excellent perspective on the election outcome for business which can be viewed in the News section of its website at www.portcullispublicaffairs.com/oh-what-a-night-and-what-it-means/

It is almost a cliché that businesses hate uncertainty, so the implications for businesses, especially for SMEs, are not good. This has been made worse by a Prime Minister who appears to be anti-business and a manifesto that offered no reassurance to business.

Companies were already holding back on investment decisions and, in some cases, struggling to keep afloat in the face of rising costs on imported raw materials and oil thanks to the post referendum devaluation in £Sterling.

Trading conditions have gradually become more difficult since the start of 2017 as inflation and wage stagnation have fed through into the economy and dented consumer confidence – not helpful where so many small businesses in the service sector rely so heavily on consumer spending.

Many have felt that the government was not listening to or considering their concerns. Among the issues and proposals they have highlighted have been:

  • The lack of provision of growth funding after 2020 when current EU Funding ends (FSB chairman Mike Cherry).  This particularly affects SMEs in poorer parts of the country.
  • Abandoning the customs union, which allows UK firms to trade in the EU without paperwork, tariffs or barriers.
  • Requiring businesses to disclose the numbers of foreign workers they employ and failing to provide any assurances that those already working in the UK will be able to remain.  This affects all businesses where there is a skills shortage, such as construction, engineering and seasonal work on farms.
  • Being prepared to walk away without an agreement if the EU does not agree to UK’s terms.

With barely a week to go before formal negotiations are due to begin businesses have been signalling plummeting confidence and urgently demanding more engagement, flexibility and pragmatism on their needs.

Immediately after the election the Institute of Directors (IoD) reported a significant drop in confidence among the 700 members it has asked. IoD Director General Stephen Martin said the current uncertainty could have disastrous consequences for UK businesses.

“The needs of business and discussion of the economy were largely absent from the campaign,” he said. “but this crash in confidence shows how urgently that must change in the new government.”

Portcullis’ briefing ends with the view that without specialist advice businesses face making strategic errors that could be costly, or even fatal, in the current uncertain political climate.

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