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Labour's promise on zero hours contracts may result in a rise in unemployment

The run-up to an election can be relied on to generate ambiguously-worded promises that may or may not be delivered by the eventual winner.
One such is the promise in Labour’s manifesto to “ban exploitative zero hours contracts so that if you work regular hours you get a regular contract”.
This pledge has been truncated in some media to “ban exploitative zero hours contracts”.
Either way the pledge could be read in more than one way. Is it a complete ban on all zero hours contracts or is the key word here “exploitative”?
The fact is that a zero hours contract can be very useful, particularly for SMEs to justify employing staff. In a volatile market it gives a company flexibility and allows it to keep overheads as low as possible by tailoring the workforce to demand. Orders cannot be guaranteed and businesses will behave rationally. If they cannot use zero hours contracts then they have other alternatives such as overtime for existing employees, to simply not take on the work, to outsource it to low-wage or more flexible countries, or they can use agency-supplied workers.
There is one aspect of “exploitation” that does need to be addressed which is when an employer makes the contract exclusive to them thus preventing the employee from taking any other work to fill in the gaps.
It is acknowledged that there is an issue for employees due to the lack of a guarantee of a minimum level of hours. There is however a market for jobs whereby employees will weight up the wages and security offered by some employers against those of others and behave rationally. It is also why the market for jobs needs to be underpinned by an effective unemployment benefits system.
So what is Labour really proposing? To close the loopholes that allow exploitation by allowing workers to have more than one zero hours contract? To get rid of zero hours contracts all together, and replace them, with what? To limit them somehow, whether a maximum period of work, or by size of employer?
Absent all other factors, any major reduction in the use of zero hours contracts will result in a rise of unemployment. This may however be the real objective of Labour’s paymasters as it is believed that very few employees on zero hours contracts are members of unions.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

How can you as a small business fund the growth of your team?

Zero hours contracts were heralded as a tool that would help businesses to keep their wage bills under control, by only paying employees for the time they spent actually working.
No wonder they were enthusiastically taken up by many large employers and could have been ideal for small growing businesses with tight margins. Regretfully most small businesses do not employ advisers on how to structure such contracts so they are not that common among small businesses who more often use sub-contract or piece-work contracts.
Zero hours contracts have also proven to be a problem because some employers abuse them by using clauses that prevent employees from taking other work even when there was none available with the contractor, leaving the worker with an uncertain income or in some instances no income and certainly no safety net. No wonder unemployment statistics have declined.
Legislation is on the way to change this but it raises the question as to how small businesses can attract and keep the best staff and how they can find the money to pay them a reasonable wage while at the same time developing capacity for a growing business.
It may be that revamped zero hours contracts will be useful to smaller businesses but legislating against the abuses will be difficult. For the moment the preferred option is likely to continue, that of outsourcing work to trusted sub-contractors.
Sub-contractors are often small businesses or sole traders themselves who take pride in their work and have a vested interest in building long-term relationships with clients. Essentially they become part of your team without the cost or obligations of employment.
Collaboration and partnering arrangements offer scope for growing both businesses.
Let us know how you are funding the growth of your team without breaking the bank.

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General HR, Redundancy & Trade Unions Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Can employers expect loyalty from workers on Zero Hours contracts?

Employee consultation and support can, in our view, make a huge difference to success when a company in difficulties is being restructured.
But it has emerged that as many as 90% of Sports Direct employees are employed on part-time, Zero hours contracts, and therefore are unlikely to be eligible for the company’s recently-announced bonus payouts. It has been reported that only full-time employees are eligible for the bonus.
Given that these contracts are now used for about 1 million UK employees we should question them. 
The advantages to the employer are obvious in that they only pay for workers’ time as and when needed and there are reduced, or even no, entitlements to sickness and holiday pay, thus enabling a company to keep its overheads under control.
Despite their flexibility, which may be appropriate for a very few employees, the contracts offer few guarantees or certainties and yet could result in considerable hardship for employees due to them being expected to be available at short notice without guarantee that they will earn enough to provide a living wage.
At the same time employees on Zero Hours contracts are viewed as being in employment and therefore not eligible for any state help in weeks when they have had no work or pay.  Nor can a worker on such a contract take on any other work to supplement their income if they are required to be available at short notice.
We believe they could be abused by employers and support Business Secretary Vince Cable’s initiative for a review of Zero Hours contracts and how they are being used.