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Accounting & Bookkeeping

A chance to get involved in a much-needed review

The terms and conditions governing most financial transactions affect us all in both our business and our personal lives.
A modern, properly transparent and regulated personal property security law, or transactional law, is central to the functioning of an economy, affecting everyone from small businesses, borrowers and finance providers of all types, creditors and debtors, lawyers, insolvency practitioners and lawyers.
According to Professor Louise Gullifer, executive director of the Secured Transaction Law Reform Project, a wide-ranging project investigating English transaction law, the current situation has serious flaws, some of which follow:
It is a complex mixture of case law and a number of statutes, which may guarantee lawyers an income but is opaque to both them and the non-experts it might be affecting.
Current law on fixed and floating charges can affect the cost of credit and the willingness of financial institutions to lend especially to unincorporated small businesses, forcing them into structuring themselves in forms that may not be appropriate to their needs in order to access secured finance.
In the case of insolvency, the lack of an up to date, clear and transparent registration system for secured assets can complicate matters for both creditors and debtors.
Business rescue is often hampered by the emergence of security that is not registered with Companies House or on the Land Register. This relates to a lack of transparency about ownership or control of specific pledge assets that distorts most balance sheets such that corporate solvency and viability is often not clear.
This is a wide-ranging and comprehensive project looking into this and the organisers are inviting as many people as possible to get involved, make comments, or raise concerns.  There’s more on the secured transactions law reform project website: http://securedtransactionslawreformproject.org/

Categories
Accounting & Bookkeeping Cash Flow & Forecasting County Court, Legal & Litigation Debt Collection & Credit Management Factoring, Invoice Discounting & Asset Finance General Interim Management & Executive Support Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery

Companies are failing to manage Debt Collection and Credit terms

Many companies are risking their own solvency and ability to carry on trading because they neither manage their debt collection proactively nor have clear procedures for setting and imposing credit terms with their customers. Consequently they are suffering from late payments, or worse having to write off invoices due to bad debts.
They compound the problem by extending credit to customers who turn out to be a bad risk.  If a customer is itself borrowing money under a factoring or invoice discount facility then the company is depending on their customer’s customers thus creating a pack of cards that if recoursed as a bad debt after 90 days could bring down everyone in a supply chain.
I believe the root of the problem to be the company’s own credit management where I find that very few companies have a robust system in place.
The key steps are to do a credit check on any new customer, to set limits, manage them and regularly review customers’ credit levels.
Getting paid however requires more than just a credit check, it involves starting management of invoice payment long before it is due. Checking the invoice is approved for payment for example, will avoid discovering that the order was not fulfilled exactly as required, or the invoice has not been received! 
Paperwork is crucial. There should be a procedure in place whereby the delivered/ completed order is signed for/ off with a clause on the document that includes written confirmation that the customer’s requirement has been satisfactorily fulfilled.
In addition companies also need late payment procedures. If an invoice remains unpaid after the due date, a robust system for managing late and non paying customers should include putting a stop on processing any further orders and debt collection that may result in litigation, and enforcement if necessary.