Categories
Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Change is now the only constant

 

Consumers and clients are fickle, the pace of life is accelerating and it’s all thanks to the internet.

It may be a bit harsh but the SME that wants to do more than just survive needs to not only ensure the quality of its products or services and of its customer service, but also to be alert to potential new innovations and changing customer habits.

Here’s an example – a cafe in London recently switched from charging customers for coffee to charging customers an hourly rate for the time they stayed there.  The owner had noticed that his cafe had become popular with self employed people with laptops looking for a place to work.

The change has reportedly been popular with customers and illustrates the point that these days it pays to be flexible, responsive and therefore change the business model to meet new situations.

Here’s another example.  At one time a business website would likely have been seen either on a PC or a laptop.  Not any more. Now web developers have to produce something that will accommodate itself to these and to tablets and mobile phones.  It’s called responsive design.

A business model does two things.  It can set short, medium and long term financial and growth goals but it is also a daily and weekly satnav to be referred to often.

Increasingly, savvy businesses need to build a responsive model that can cater to changing circumstances as well as keep them on track for the longer term.

Categories
Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting General Turnaround

Self Employed? You need to think like a Business

 

The government has been playing up a rise in disposable income, culled from figures compiled by the Office of National Statistics (ONS), but there is one fact that has been conveniently ignored.

This is that the ONS pay figures do not include earnings by the self-employed.

According to the research organisation the Resolution Foundation, the numbers of self-employed have increased by 26 per cent between 2002 and 2013 while their median reported income had dropped by 28% (approximately £4,000) between 2001 and 2010.

The TUC estimates that  540,000 of the approximately 1 million jobs created since 2008 have been through self-employment.

These are the people who supply the “outsourced” services – from plumbing to IT to Marketing to Consulting – that SMEs rely on.  They are also themselves SMEs as far as HMRC is concerned, where they are classified as sole traders.

No matter what their skills, arguably these are micro businesses with potential to grow, and as the economic recovery continues, they will hopefully be able to benefit.

But like any business, even a one-person micro business needs to set goals, have a business plan, understand finance, and have a marketing strategy for advertising and promoting themselves to generate business leads. 

Furthermore they need a passion and determination to succeed.  Being self-employed can be a lonely existence but need not be with the support of mentors, local networking and business organisations, industry groups or business advisors, any and all of whom can make a huge difference.