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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing Factoring, Invoice Discounting & Asset Finance Finance General

Is raising finance from debt crowdfunding a good idea?

In the second in our series on crowdfunding we’re focusing on debt crowdfunding, also called Peer to Business lending.
Typically lenders are looking to finance tangible assets that they can secure, such as book debts, vehicles or plant & machinery. However all too often businesses want to finance business growth which might involve business development, staff or simply working capital. The banks have largely withdrawn from such funding unless security can be provided. As a result there is an explosion of crowdfunding with most models based on loans.
In the debt crowdfunding model most loans are based on compounding interest with equal monthly repayments for the duration of the loan which is normally for between 2 and 5 years.
According to Nicola Horlick, chief executive of Money&Co, writing in CityAM in April 2015, debt crowdfunding is the source of funding for the vast majority of UK SMEs. She argues that this type of crowdfunding is less risky than equity crowdfunding because of the high failure rate of start-ups, whereas a debt funder like herself will ask for several years of made-up accounts.
Funding Circle is probably the best known debt crowdfunder in UK. It has loaned about £750 million to 7,300 businesses in UK and US. Examples include Blood & Sand who borrowed £104,000 in October 2014 from 100s of individual lenders to refurbish their new cocktail bar in London.
Given the risks, such loans are not much cheaper than those from a bank but they tend to be easier to obtain. However despite the perception of an easy loan, most funding platforms rely on directors giving a personal guarantee so as to make sure that they have every intention of repaying the loan.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Cash Flow & Forecasting Debt Collection & Credit Management Factoring, Invoice Discounting & Asset Finance General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs

Businesses Should Pay Down Debt and Beware Offers That Seem Too Good to be True

Many businesses are overburdened with debt and desperate for ways to deal with pressure from banks, HMRC and other creditors. All too often they are prepared to pay off old debt by taking on new debt which leaves them vulnerable to unscrupulous lenders.
Prior to 2008, interest-only loans and overdrafts were a common method of funding, and were reliant on being able to renew facilities or refinancing.
Like many interest-only loans, an overdraft is renewed, normally on an annual basis, but it is also repayable on demand. What happens when the bank doesn’t want to renew the overdraft facility?  With the economic climate continuing to be volatile and uncertain and banks under intense pressure to improve their own balance sheets, they are increasingly insisting on converting overdrafts to repayment loans and interest-only finance is disappearing.
This has created a vacuum for alternative sources of funding to enter the market where distinguishing between the credible salesman and the ‘snake oil’ salesman can be very difficult. Desperate businesses are desperate often try to borrow money and become more vulnerable to what at first sight seem to be lenders that can offer them alternative funding solutions that the banks cannot.
Generally the advice is to beware, as the recent eight-year prison sentence handed to “Lord” Eddie Davenport illustrates.  The charges related to a conspiracy to defraud, deception and money laundering, also referred to as “advanced fees fraud”. 
The court found Davenport and two others guilty in September. Meanwhile a large number of businesses had paid tens of thousands of pounds for due diligence and deposit fees for loans that never materialised and left victims even deeper in debt. The case only became reportable in October, when restrictions were lifted.
Many businesses just want to survive and are trading with no plan or in some cases no prospect for repaying debt. In such instances they should be considering options for improving their balance sheet by reducing debt. Options might include swapping debt for equity, or debt forgiveness by creditors or setting up a CVA (Company Voluntary Arrangement).