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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery

Culture Shock

If all the recommendations in the Banking Commission’s long-awaited report on banking standards are implemented the banking industry will undergo a profound change in its operating culture.
We would argue that it is not only in banking and finance that a change in culture is long overdue following the 2008 credit crunch.
Businesses and consumers have already had to rethink the way they manage their finances. Businesses have been paying down debt and larger companies with comfortable capital reserves are not spending or investing. Consumers, too, are trying to repair their finances while coping with rising inflation and falling incomes.
Depending on which audience they are speaking to, however, Government seems to be wedded to austerity, sustainability or growth, as the solution to the UK’s economic ills.  
Every new monthly statistic is used to herald imminent recovery.  Most recently, new figures showing a 17% rise in mortgage lending in May 2013, compared to May 2012, will doubtless be seized on as evidence of success for schemes like Funding for Lending and the newer Help to Buy in stimulating home ownership.
Yet all the “experts” warn that without massive additional home building, they risk precipitating another housing bubble because the lack of affordable small homes will overinflate house prices.
With the homeless charity Shelter estimating that a first time buyer may have to spend 14 years raising the deposit to get on the property ladder, the chances are that consumers are already facing a massive culture change from home ownership to long-term renting, but without the tenancy protections that used to provide some security and continuity in living arrangements.
Is it time that politicians stopped grasping at short term electioneering straws and underwent their own cultural revolution to get real about economic life in the 21st Century?

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery

When will businesses invest in the future?

It is hardly a closely-guarded secret that the UK’s largest companies are holding onto a large pile of cash, estimated to be more than £300 billion.
While the Government is expecting recovery from the 2008 economic crisis to come from the private sector, the latter remains focused on minimising tax bills and maximising short term rewards to shareholders and CEOs, while avoiding risky investment at all costs.
One of the major complaints among businesses at all levels is that they are finding it hard to recruit the skilled and educated people they need. At the same time investment in research and development is dwindling.
There can be no future reward without taking some risks and thinking for the longer term but businesses also have to recognise that their activities are also made possible because of the benefits they derive from a combination of the physical infrastructure and education system, the so-called public goods that are often taken for granted.
Perhaps it is about time that businesses realised that if they want to grow and develop and if they want a supply of educated people, they need to take some responsibility by unlocking some of their capital to support innovative new enterprises, to invest in Research and Development in our universities and in their own companies and to help the existing and future workforce to acquire the skills companies say are in short supply.
This may require a degree of restructuring of companies’ own operations and at the very least restructuring their current short term, risk-averse thinking to enable investment over a longer period.
While the Government is considering closing the loopholes that make tax avoidance possible it could perhaps also consider a tax on unused capital sitting on company balance sheets to stimulate some investment in the economic future of UK Plc.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Is it Realistic for Private Businesses to Employ more Staff in 2011?

The majority of businesses in the UK are defined as small and employ fewer than 50 people while only one per cent of UK companies employ more than 1000 people.
Small businesses would generally be defined as having fewer than 50 employees, assets worth less than £5 million and a turnover less than £5 million, yet they account for two thirds of the UK’s private sector.
The Government is pinning its hopes of recovery on dramatically and quickly reducing the country’s budget deficit with a combination of cutbacks, including making an estimated 330,000 people in the public sector redundant, a figure revised downwards in November 2010 from its estimate of 490,000 the previous June.
This revision, albeit in human terms still a large number of people, is based on its forecast for growth in the economy in 2011 of 2.1% for all of which it relies on the private sector – the majority of which is made up of small businesses.
Economists and politicians are both emphasising that the opportunities for growth lie largely in increasing exports on the grounds that there is a burgeoning middle class in the fastest growing economies, like China, India, Brazil and Russia (the BRICS) with a growing appetite for sophisticated technology and household products.
But while this might be an option for businesses involved in manufacture it does not help those many small businesses providing services and products to local businesses and consumers in the UK only.
The UK manufacturing sector currently accounts for 26% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and the Government’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) published a White Paper proposing to expand adult apprenticeships by up to 75,000 by 2014-15 and to set up a new £50 million Growth and Innovation Fund, with financial support to SMEs to co-fund the costs of training for lower skilled employees.
Help with skills training by 2014-15 is hardly much use in 2011 and in any event growth will depend on being able to both increase sales and availability of finance from the banks to fund the additional working capital needed to support them.