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How will work patterns change once Coronavirus restrictions have eased?

work patterns changingWhen working life resumes properly once Coronavirus restrictions have eased people may find that their work patterns are substantially different from previously.
While, sadly, some SMEs will not have survived others may find that their agility and perhaps new innovations introduced during lockdown will have given their businesses a new lease of life for the future.
Those who have shown consideration for their employees, suppliers and customers will have built up a level of goodwill that will stand them in good stead for the future.
I shall examine in another blog those businesses, sectors and processes that may benefit from the changed landscape but in this blog I am focusing on the likely changes to business work patterns and the relationships between employers and their stakeholders.
Because, of course, employers are also people, they will have discovered that they and their families are no more immune to the health risks of the pandemic than any of their employees.
This may well result in an increase in empathy between people at all levels and result in closer and more considerate working relations.
Indeed, an article in Forbes highlights this among the many beneficial changes in work patterns likely to be the result.
It identifies key positives that could result including increased support from businesses for employees: “Companies have been forced to consider employee wellbeing more holistically—in terms of not only the physical, but also mental and emotional wellbeing.”
Employees may find that their employers are much more aware of their different family responsibilities and more understanding of the ways family and friends are critical to life and happiness.
At a more basic level, if employees are to return to their workplaces, their health and workplace safety will be a high priority, suggesting an end to hot-desking, for example, leading to safer workspaces.
Desks could become spaced out, partitions could go up, cleaning stations stocked with hand sanitizer and antibacterial wipes will become the norm, and workers may seek out new places for focused work.
At a more basic level, safe travel to work may mean more people cycling or walking and less use of public transport, which is something that employers may have to take into account.
Dealing with the crisis, Forbes argues, could result in more effective leaders, especially those who “communicate clearly, stay calm and strong, demonstrate empathy, think long-term and take appropriate decisive action.”
Arguably, it says, relationships with teammates will also be stronger and closer after people have faced a common enemy.
New work patterns will also allow for more diversity and flexibility where businesses have discovered that it is perfectly possible to run effectively with employees working remotely, perhaps also having discovered new skills and strengths among their employees as a result.
Similarly, the new “normal” may have made it clear how few physical meetings are actually needed compared to pre-pandemic working life. This may well lead to employees’ work patterns involving far less bureaucracy and offering more opportunities for them to innovate and suggest ideas for future development.
It may also lead to greater use of new technology based on the new skills learnt while in isolation lockdown at home.
Savvy SME owners will be those who assess the good things that have come out of the crisis and incorporate them into more flexible work patterns for those valued employees who have stuck by them in difficult times, to the benefit of both the business and all those who work in it.
 

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Why should SMEs have a staff handbook?

taff handbookIt is important for employees, and management, to know exactly what is expected of them by way of appropriate behaviour, legally-imposed regulations and any specific company policies.
Businesses are required to oversee compliance by staff of all manner of regulations such as Health and Safety, manual handling, smoking, noise, abuse and discrimination to name just a few.
However, new laws and regulations are constantly being imposed on businesses and others are subject to change. While in the past such policies might have been incorporated into each employee’s contract of employment, the constant changes make updating them almost impossible. Instead contracts of employment can be quite short by referring to a staff handbook that can be kept up to date.
Businesses vary greatly in what they include in the employee handbook, but some can run to some 60 pages.
The essentials that should be in a staff handbook
Essentially, the handbook is combination of quality, management and reference manual. They are particularly useful when inducting new employees or as a reference manual when dealing with grievances and disciplinary matters, or sickness and absence.
Therefore, it makes sense for every business to have a well-structured staff manual, no matter whether it is an SME or a larger company.
Ideally, a staff handbook should be clear with an easy to search index so that it can be used for training purposes and referred to when dealing with problems that may arise.
It should contain company policies on dress codes and behaviour, information about claiming expenses, health & safety, security, personal safety, use of vehicles and driving while on company time, and lots of statutory policies.  It might include instructions for using technology and telephones, while most companies now forbid staff from using phones while driving and some forbid their staff from taking calls on business phones outside working hours.
Others have instructions for operating specific equipment or machinery as might relate to departments, while these can be incorporated into the staff handbook they might instead be appended in working instructions that apply to the relevant department. Either way such instructions should be referred to in contracts of employment and the staff handbook as observing them will be a condition of employment.
Staff handbooks should include reference to policies on equal opportunities, Disciplinary Rules and Procedures, Grievance Procedure and Health and Safety Policy.
While there is no need to include the details of the legislation they should point to where both staff and management can find more information.
There are many other policies, these days, that businesses may also have, such as on drug and alcohol consumption, especially where they expect employees to drive motor vehicles. Email security is also a major area where employee compliance is key including internet security, protecting company systems from unauthorised access and viruses, accessing inappropriate or non-work-related websites, personal use of company computers and telephones or social media. Sickness and absence, parental leave, data protection and whistleblowing are also normally covered.
Again, staff and management need to be familiar with the policies and procedures and know that they exist, and where to go for detailed information.
An up to date staff handbook should be available on staff noticeboards with notice of any changes that might be relevant. These should also be covered during a periodic staff review and every now and then an updated staff handbook should be issued to all staff.
It might need to be longer than 60 pages but, however long, every company that employs staff needs a staff handbook.