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Banks, Lenders & Investors Finance General

Can Private Equity solve the funding gap?

The equity funding gap remains a huge problem for SMEs.
There seem to be two gaps. The first is for businesses raising between £500,000 and £2 million of equity where below this threshold there is a healthy market of Angel and Crowd investors for businesses to approach, but for some reason
Private Equity is focusing on much larger investments, normally above £2m.
The second gap is for businesses wishing to invest in R&D or marketing where it seems that Private Equity finance has become more like debt finance, focusing mainly on profitable businesses.
So if you had, say, a chain of five restaurants with a proven business model you would have no shortage of funds for the next five. If, on the other hand, you wanted to grow from one to two or three you would have a problem.
Despite the rhetoric from Government, banks and many others about the need to support SMEs if economic growth is to be restored to pre-2008 crisis levels, the incentives aren’t working.
With appropriate government incentives, we believe that PE firms could be encouraged to fund the equity gap.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Cash Flow & Forecasting Factoring, Invoice Discounting & Asset Finance General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

How can smaller businesses fund growth in the economic upturn?

 

A new report by the Credit Management Research Centre and Taulia has revealed that UK companies have been relying heavily on trade credit.

It is also well known that traditional bank lending to SMEs declined by 20% in the last 12 months.

This is despite bank claims that they have plenty of cash to lend and a perception that they are declining loan applications. More realistically the decline in bank lending is down to loan criteria being tightened and the fact that credit worthy companies have been paying down loans instead of funding growth.

So how are small businesses going to fund the expected increase in business and orders that come with economic recovery from recession?

If a company accepts orders without being able to finance them it runs the risk of insolvency through overtrading, which is why so many commentators point out that most insolvencies occur during the upturn after a recession.

Given that many good businesses have used the recession to pay down debt, it can be assumed that their balance sheets have improved and therefore they will be easily able to raise finance for growth from the banks.

However there are a lot of SMEs that do not have a strong enough balance sheet to justify traditional funding. Where these sources are not available they are looking to fund growth using alternative sources of finance.

In the past such sources were myriad, such as from friends and family, negotiating deals with well funded suppliers, early payment terms from customers and even credit cards, but the banks remained dominant. Over the past 20 years asset based lending has grown since it can advance more funds than the banks due to the specific pledge nature of its security. More recently we are seeing a new route to finance from peer-to-peer and crowd funding websites.

The website based sources appear attractive and are often easier for obtaining funding but they can incorporate obligations such as a personal guarantee for the loan from the directors.

In April 2014 the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) introduced new rules on loan-based (money loaned) and investment-based (share subscription) crowd funding that require the lenders to carry a certain amount of capital, to be open about defining the risks and to have resolution procedures in place in case of the lending platform failing.

It is likely that the online funding platforms will become stricter and require more information from borrowers before making a decision, but if used wisely they offer a great source of funding to growing SMEs.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Is Starting a Business in a Recession Wise or Foolish?

It is no secret that the Government is relying on SMEs to stimulate both the economic recovery and jobs.
Lord Young, senior adviser to the Prime Minister, is on record as saying that a recession may actually be a good time to start a small business on the grounds that wages are low, competition may have fallen by the wayside and premises, too, may also be cheaper to get.
That’s all well and good but there is more to starting a business than having a bright idea and the passion and motivation to get started.
There are a number of other factors to consider, especially where the business is something new and innovative and therefore unlikely to raise finance from currently risk-averse banks and investors.
A start-up must carry out research, identify potential customers, set sensible targets and put all of this into a business plan.  If it needs finance it should consider alternatives to the mainstream sources, whether these are friends and family, partnering with existing firms, seed funding, crowd funding or business angels and also investigate what grants and special concessions may be available that will help in the first year or two of trading.
A mentor or business guardian to help set the path and keep things on track can also make the difference between success and failure.  It’s impossible for a novice to do everything themselves without support and joining local business networks can also be a valuable source of advice and support.
If it is the kind of venture that can benefit from collaboration with other enterprises where there is a synergy, this is an option worth exploring since partnering with existing businesses in a market will help a start-up forge relationships with both a supply chain and  potential customers.
When money is tight, entrepreneurs should explore cash saving ideas such as offering equity, or future work, or future discounts, or other benefits in kind to any business that can provide them with useful services. Examples include introduction to customers, advice, market research, book keeping & accountancy, manufacturing prototypes, provision of office space, use of specialist or expensive equipment, and many more ideas that are only limited by the entrepreneur’s imagination.
Recession or not, starting up a business is all about doing all you can to weight the odds in your favour.