Categories
Banks, Lenders & Investors General Insolvency Liquidation, Pre-Packs & Phoenix Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Pre-packs under scrutiny again?

Baker Tilly’s purchase of the debt-laden accountancy firm RMS Tenon has put the use of pre-pack administration under the spotlight again. It follows other recent high profile pre-packs such as Dreams and Gatecrasher and the debate about Hibu as publisher of Yellow Pages.
While a pre-pack may be a useful tool for saving a struggling business by “selling” its business and assets to a new company immediately upon appointment of an Administrator, the consequences to unsecured creditors and shareholders can be catastrophic as it normally involves writing-off most of their debt and all the investors’ equity. The only beneficiaries are normally banks and other secured creditors who control the process through their appointed insolvency practitioners.
In the case of RMS Tenon, which had more than £80.4 million of debt, unsecured creditors and investors are reportedly furious that their entire debt and shareholdings have been wiped out, the more so because Lloyds TSB, its only secured lender, allegedly forced the sale by refusing to grant a covenant waiver while at the same time agreeing to finance Baker Tilly’s purchase of the assets of RMS Tenon.
While the sale has safeguarded the jobs of around 2,300 RMS Tenon staff, and this is surely to be welcomed in the current economic climate, there are plenty who will once again question pre-pack administration. It may be legal, but is it an acceptable and ethical method of rescuing a business in distress? There are other restructuring options that offer a better outcome for creditors and shareholders, such as Schemes of Arrangement and Company Voluntary Arrangement for instance. But all too often these are not pursued.
As the UK economy proceeds along its halting path to recovery the last thing that is needed is short-term and self-interested behaviour by secured creditors.

Categories
General HM Revenue & Customs, VAT & PAYE Personal Guarantees Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs

How to protect Personal Guarantees when a company is insolvent

Many insolvent companies are being run to avoid the triggering of personal guarantees given by directors and owners.
Most personal guarantees are provided to secured creditors such as a bank to cover loans or overdrafts that are already protected by a debenture which provides for a fixed and floating charge over the company’s assets. In such cases the personal guarantee is often only triggered by liquidation when the bank is left with a shortfall.
In view of the above I am astonished how many directors plough on, stretching payments to HMRC and extending unsecured creditor liabilities without fundamentally improving their company’s financial situation via a company voluntary arrangement (CVA).
Secured creditors stand outside a CVA and therefore they have no need to call upon a personal guarantee.
I would urge all professional advisers, including accountants, lawyers and consultants to learn about CVAs since they are such a powerful tool for saving companies and in so doing avoiding personal guarantees being triggered.

Categories
Cash Flow & Forecasting General HM Revenue & Customs, VAT & PAYE Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs Winding Up Petitions

HMRC Insolvency and Enforcement workload

The HM Revenue and Customs insolvency and enforcement department in Worthing appears to have an increasing workload.
I believe there are several likely reasons for this. Businesses are continuing to withhold payment of PAYE and VAT liabilities, using any cash available to prop up their businesses. Fewer Time to Pay arrangements are being approved by HMRC and a lot of TTP arrangements are failing. The Revenue have also have resumed using seizure and distraint as a method for collecting overdue tax.
HMRC in Worthing are picking up the pieces, which probably explains the large number of Winding Up Petitions that dominate the Companies Winding Up Courts.
The only options for saving a company with a WUP are either paying the undisputed amount due or a Company Voluntary Arrangement and the Courts are generally happy to adjourn the Petition at the first hearing to allow time to either pay the bill or propose a CVA.
There is considerable evidence that HMRC are supporting the rescue of companies via CVAs although their focus is on proposals being realistic and incorporating fundamental change to ensure survival rather than continuing the old business model.
I am not yet clear whether the upsurge in HMRC Worthing’s activity relates to the traditional post recession increases in company failures when the market begins to grow, or whether the downturn is continuing and companies are just not able to hang on any longer.
However all of us in the restructuring profession must urge the directors of companies in difficulties to act urgently if they are to save their company, and that they or we as advisers keep HMRC fully informed of progress during the development of rescue plans.

Categories
General Insolvency Liquidation, Pre-Packs & Phoenix Personal Guarantees Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Guide to Pre-Pack Administration from K2 Business Rescue

Pre-pack Administration is a tool for saving struggling businesses that are in severe financial difficulties but are potentially sound. Pre-packs allow the business idea to be preserved, retaining customers, suppliers and goodwill, without all the start-up costs normally associated with a new business.
Essentially it means “selling” the business to a new company immediately upon appointment of an Administrator, the preparation for sale being carried out prior to appointment.  The sale requires additional scrutiny if the directors and shareholders of the new company are the same as in the previous company to prevent any abuse.
Insolvency practitioners use pre-pack administrations to achieve the swift sale of a business where it is not appropriate for them to trade the business as a company in administration. This way the business can continue to trade without disruption.
Reasons for not trading a company in administration include avoiding the administrators’ costs and the risks of trading a company in administration. It is often argued that key stakeholders such as customers, staff or suppliers will not remain loyal to a company in administration.
A pre-pack is only one form of administration. In normal administrations there are a number of possible outcomes including return of the company to the control of the directors, such as following a restructuring or a Company Voluntary Arrangement, or the administrator can sell the business and assets ahead of liquidation. In the pre-pack form assets are sold immediately on appointment of the administrator, who does not then trade the company.
Pre-packs also have huge advantages in allowing the new company to trade without the burden of the previous company’s debt, almost without disruption keeping valued staff and equipment, contracts, relationships and customers. 
While a pre-pack is often regarded as controversial because the creditors are faced with a done deal, the counter argument is that a swift sale of the business assets is the best opportunity to preserve value and therefore ensure the best possible return for the creditors who might otherwise get nothing or very little.
However, to prevent abuse, especially as the creditors do not get a chance to object, before a company can use this method it must show it has taken advice from an insolvency practitioner who must ensure the business and assets are independently valued and not sold below their value.