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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing Finance General

The UK Film Industry – sector focus for July

The UK film industry offers settings like this for international film makersrIt’s good to write about a UK business success story, the UK film industry, which has become an important economic sector having grown faster than much of the UK economy.
According to the DCMS (Department for Digital, Media, Culture and Sport) in November 2018 the value of the creative industries as a whole to the UK was up from £94.8 billion in 2016 and had broken through the £100 billion barrier. It said the sectors had grown at nearly twice the rate of the economy since 2010 and together are now worth £268 billion.
For the film world specifically not only does the UK have a widespread and skilled support base of experienced film production crews and technicians, it also has both the locations and the studios to attract the biggest film companies from around the world. It is an industry that employs an estimated 60,000 people.
Then there is the knock-on effect into the wider local economy, not only by boosting the tourism sector, but also in some other surprising ways. We know of one Essex-based haulier who reports consistent and increasing contracts for transporting materials, equipment and support units to film locations as well as to studios like Shepperton and Pinewood.
Last week, Netflix announced what is believed to be a 10-year deal to lease Shepperton Film Studios near London, where it plans to create a dedicated UK production hub, including 14 sound stages, plus workshops and office space at the site owned by the Pinewood Group.
Another recent example is the newly-released Danny Boyle/Richard Curtis film ‘Yesterday’, filmed almost entirely in Suffolk, Norfolk and Essex.
These are only the latest results of an ongoing investment in the UK film industry, which has been stimulated by Government tax breaks and local authority initiatives that have encouraged spending by international filmmakers.
According to figures from the BFI (British Film Institute) 2017 saw the highest level of spend by international filmmakers ever recorded, reaching £1.692 billion.
But the success of the UK film industry has not only been about attracting international film makers. Production of home grown films in 2017 had also risen, with 72 films going into production including ‘Mary Queen of Scots’ directed by Josie Rourke; ‘Yardie’ directed by Idris Elba, ‘Peterloo’ directed by Mike Leigh; ‘Close’ directed by Vicky Jewson; and ‘The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind’ directed by Chiwetel Ejiofor.
UK cinema revenues have also grown, reaching £1.3 billion (totaling 170.6 million admissions) that same year.
According to the ONS (Office for National Statistics) the gross value added to the economy by film, video and television companies has increased by 313 percent since 2008.

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting Insolvency Turnaround

How to make failure your first step towards business success

failure is just one step on the road to successNone of us is perfect.  Perhaps that is why we admire so-called successful people so much.
But behind almost every business success lies a series of failures. Just ask Thomas Edison, inventor of the electric lightbulb, or Richard Branson, who has made no secret of his past business failures, or even Luke Johnson, investor in and chairman of the recently-failed Patisserie Valerie and business blogger who has written extensively about failure and pertinently for him how to spot and prevent it.
Edison said of previously unsuccessful attempts at his invention: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”
He also said: “Our greatest weakness lies in giving up.” This along with learning the lessons from failure is the key to understanding how successful people approach failure.
Failure would be better rebranded as a trial and error approach to achieving goals where essentially each instance of failure is primarily a learning experience. Each failure simply requires humility that recognises our fallibility and a degree of honesty, thought and a willingness to learn.

Converting failure to success is all about attitude

A business failure can be a devastating experience but the worst things you can do are wallow in self-pity, sink into a depression, give up or, even worse, blame others. These characterise the behaviour of a victim.
There are plenty of business gurus with advice about dealing with failure, and most will start with advising you to accept that you may have been to blame, but the key is to move on by analysing what, precisely, went wrong and to then try again, differently. Trial and error.
Firstly, you should resist the urge to repeat past mistakes by trying the same thing again, only bigger or cheaper. For example, if your customers aren’t buying your products or services you need to give careful thought to whether your business offers something they want, in the way they can buy it, rather than something you thought was a great idea but they don’t want or don’t know about. How much market research did you actually do?
Secondly, how competent are you at running a business?  Did you have a business plan? Did you regularly check cash flow, produce management accounts and so on?  Did you put in place robust credit control and other processes? We cannot all be good at everything so if you feel you do not understand any of these subjects properly you should have the humility to get in expert help and be willing to act on it.
Were you sufficiently passionate and committed to your business? It may have seemed like a sure fire way to make a lot of money, but that, on its own, is no guarantee of success.  It is also important to be emotionally invested in what you are doing and committed to making it work.
There are plenty of inspiring examples of people who have become successful after multiple failures but what they all have in common is an ability to be honest with themselves and to learn from others, to be passionate about their idea and to never give up.

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Business Development & Marketing General Interim Management & Executive Support

Is your business barely managing and if so why?

Business barely managing in stormEvidence suggests that many UK businesses are barely managing when compared to foreign-owned businesses of equivalent size operating in the UK.
At the moment it is easy to blame everything on the uncertainty surrounding the outcome of the UK’s negotiations to leave the EU, especially as political positions remain entrenched and seemingly irreconcilable with just 40 or so days to go before the deadline.
As the most recent productivity figures from the ONS (Office for National Statistics) showed, productivity and output per hour fell to their weakest in two years at the end of 2018, prompting FSB (Federation of Small Businesses) Chairman, Mike Cherry, to opine: “”Productivity data demonstrates exactly what a prolonged period of uncertainty does to an economy. Small business confidence has dropped to its lowest point since the financial crash, with four in ten firms expecting their performance to worsen.”
Of course, Brexit has prompted more businesses to divert their attention to do such things as stockpiling raw materials or components to mitigate any potential supply chain disruption, and of course, investors have been holding onto their money during this period of uncertainty.
It has also been suggested that another inhibitor to SME growth and scaling up has been what is known as the Seven-year Rule, whereby tax breaks for investors, made through tax-efficient venture capital trusts or via the enterprise investment scheme (EIS), are only accessible to companies for seven years after they make their first sale. This, it is argued, makes it harder for SMEs to access the finance they need to scale up.

Is business barely managing a “British Disease”?

However, in this context I would argue Brexit is a distraction and a convenient excuse for poor productivity and that the answer lies in the way UK businesses value, or actually don’t value, their people.  This is backed up by plenty of research from many sources.
According to the Guardian business and economics opinion writer Philip Inman there is a significant difference in productivity between the way foreign-owned businesses in the UK and UK-owned ones are run.
According to ONS figures foreign-owned businesses make up one in four of large UK-based businesses and are twice as productive as their domestically-owned equivalents. When it comes to medium-sized companies the foreign owned ones are about three times as productive.
Why should that be?
There is, argues Inman, plenty of evidence that the foreign-owned UK businesses pay attention to two things that affect productivity: processes and structure.  The ONS has found that there is a positive link between attention to these two and productivity.
Other researchers have argued that UK businesses do not value or pay enough attention to good middle-tier management, especially in family-owned firms that have been running for more than three generations.
Middle managers often have little management training or support and this leads to a lack of confidence among both senior managers and workers that their ideas are valued and suggestions acted upon.
UK businesses of all sizes clearly need to pay more attention to their people skills and competence, their processes and structure, especially once they find themselves cast adrift on post-Brexit competitive waters.