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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting Finance General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

What factors may affect your plans and any changes to your business model?

fundamental change to business planThroughout September our blogs have focused on the considerations and factors that should be taken into account in preparing strategies for business change.
Some final thoughts before October, when our blogs will focus on the next step, of implementing the plan and making any changes.
 

Fundamental change or partial adjustment?

For some businesses, a review may identify the need for fundamental change but for most it will identify areas for improvement and most likely cost savings.
Those facing fundamental change are likely to be the result of internal factors such as resource or capacity issues or external ones, such as markets disappearing due to the EU referendum, or costs increasing due to the impact of exchange rates.
In this scenario the business will need to transform itself with a completely new offering.  A good example is the recent closure of all the BHS stores and the subsequent announcement of plans to set up an online BHS shop instead.
Another example is that following the Brexit decision, businesses that sourced their manufacture overseas may now have found that it is actually cheaper to manufacture at home to take advantage of the lower export costs following the changes to currency exchange rates, particularly £Sterling, making UK export prices more competitive.
In this sense, UK could be about to reverse the trend of the last 30 years, of closing down factories to outsource the manufacturing of goods which can now be made more cheaply at home. In the UK, if energy prices and the value of £Sterling remain low on-shoring manufacturing would make sense, but it will require significant investment in manufacturing capacity and the training of labour.
Essentially, therefore, reviewing your current business model is not only about understanding the current and likely future of economic conditions, but also what your business is selling and asking difficult questions about changing customer needs and behaviours. Any delay in making difficult decisions can leave a business behind those who are more proactive.
While transformation may be needed by most businesses, some parts of the business will need attention to remain competitive.
Continuous improvement, flexibility and agility make sense, given the opportunities and competition of a global marketplace, and particularly in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

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Cash Flow & Forecasting General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Negotiating on prices – what's your business model?

Business processes word cloudHere’s an amusing, but remarkably effective, tool that graphically demonstrates the choices that have to be made in negotiations over the supply of goods or services.
When a potential customer meets this businessman they will see a wooden block and two wooden pegs on his desk. The block has three holes in it labelled quality, cost and speed.
The purpose of the pegs becomes clear as negotiations proceed.
Suppose the customer emphasises really high quality, but also wants the lowest possible price.  The pegs go in the cost and quality holes. The customer’s needs can be met, but only within the current capacity of the company’s production schedule.
If the customer wants their order delivered fast, however, the pegs would go in the speed and quality holes. The businessman knows that to produce high quality goods at speed will mean rearranging his company’s existing schedules or increasing working hours, so speed + quality would increase the production costs.

There is always a trade-off between quality, cost and speed of delivery

While customers inevitably want all three, the fact is that generally there is a trade-off. Indeed everyone knows that overnight delivery is more expensive than second class post, but customers often need to decide what their priorities really are.
If a business is well known for the quality of its goods and services it is likely to be not only successful but also working to full or near-full capacity.
It will not want to compromise this reputation so the businessman’s little wooden block is a very effective way of demonstrating the compromises that may have to be made to satisfy a customer’s requirements.
In Europe, for example, many factories will not change their production timetable but sell their capacity. Customers know what quality they will get, what price they will pay but must wait for the next available slot on the production line. This is in fact a very efficient way of producing high quality output at a reasonable price since it allows for planned production and avoids the mistakes that can be made by disruption.
Businesses need to consider their business model and decide whether they will sell their capacity, i.e. goods at a fixed price, and to have a system for providing quality goods and services. The alternative is to offer speed but recognised that they will need to be flexible to meet customers’ demands.
The one area we believe should never be compromised is quality since this relates closely to the values of the business.
(Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting Finance General

Manufacturing – Onshore or Offshore?

Business processes word cloudNot so long ago manufacturers in the developed world were off shoring, that is shifting production of their goods to places like India and China.
This was largely because labour and factory costs were so much cheaper there. But as the Chinese economy has matured Chinese labour costs have increased and this cost advantage is eroding.
The main considerations that influence the decision about where to base production are primarily costs, capacity, quality and delivery time with viable quantities being a key part of the cost factor.
Costs include labour, factory, energy, materials and equipment. Of these there are unlikely to be significant differences in the costs of materials and equipment wherever the goods are made.  Materials and equipment supply operates in a global market and therefore location is not going to affect costs.
While there is still likely to be a differential between labour and factory costs in different countries the labour portion in particular is gradually eroding and there is another factor to consider. This is the availability of the relevant skills in the workforce at home and elsewhere.
Germany and France, for example, have preserved their manufacturing bases, while the UK has not, making it more difficult for UK manufacturers to find enough skilled workers in some sectors to be able to manufacture goods onshore. Essentially this relates to the quality consideration.

What other factors affect manufacturing location?

Viable quantities, capacity and delivery time are likely to be significant issues in considering the costs and location of manufacturing.
The questions to ask are whether the offshore manufacturer is able to produce enough of the goods and how long it will take to both complete the manufacture and then to get the goods to where they are needed.
While the offshore manufacturer may have the capacity to produce bulk orders to the stated deadlines, and the length of time it takes to transport them and detailed stages of the supply chain may be significant in extending the delivery times and may adversely affect profit margins.
In this context there has been some reversal to the trend for off shoring, for example in the car industry, and moving to a model of smaller assembly units located closer to their eventual points of sale.
However, it is the interplay between all the above components that will eventually determine the best business model to use.
It may turn out to be more cost effective for a business to focus solely on the design and marketing of its products and to outsource the actual manufacture elsewhere, or focus on becoming a high quality factory knowing there is little competition and having a clear route to market.
(Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting Finance General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

When should you pivot your business model?

The term “pivot” was first applied by Eric Ries, creator of the Lean Start-up method, to describe how a new business can shift its activity in a new direction in response to customers’ behaviour.
It is a tactic used by many entrepreneurs when it becomes clear that the original business offer is not attracting the predicted level of business.
One example of a pivot was a company that was set up to sell online marketing products such as website design and found that this activity was not delivering so instead set up and promoted a Business to Consumer (B2C) shopping App, which generated much more business.
While it is necessary for a start-up to be committed to and believe wholeheartedly in its product or service, especially when it has done some market research to find out whether there is a sufficient level of demand, in a rapidly changing market it makes no sense to remain wedded to that product or service if it does not generate the projected sales.
Continuing to spend money on promotion without achieving any improvements sooner or later will lead to cash flow problems and a business in difficulty.
So while commitment is of course a fundamental ingredient for success when starting a business, flexibility and an open mind about what can be fashioned out of the core business skills are essential.
Sometimes it is necessary to pivot the business model by implementing fundamental change to achieve a transformation of the business’ prospects.

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Cash Flow & Forecasting General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

The shifting sands of retail

 

There are signs of a re-balancing between online retail and physical stores as Asos posts its second profit warning in three months.

The rise of e-commerce was regarded by many as a nail in the coffin of the High Street because it was spared the costs of expensive rents and business rates, in-store staff and high energy costs.

However, in their enthusiasm, it seems that the champions of e-commerce may not have paid enough attention to some of the additional costs involved.

While prices may be cheaper online, there are some additional costs which are turning out to be significant.

Online retailers certainly reap some benefits from centralised warehousing as opposed to a High Street presence. However they have significant packaging and shipping costs, which are proving a burden when dealing with the issue of returns and who pays for them. The additional staff handling costs can also prove significant, especially when administering returns.

This is becoming a big concern for a volatile sector like fashion and clothing, where, for example Asos  in the UK returns amount to 39% and in Germany 58%.

A major issue is the size labels used on women’s clothes. Another relates to the difference between the item on a screen and the one that is received. I know several women who order many items at a time expecting to return most of them. They choose retailers with pre-paid return policies and often return as many as 90%.

There are two examples of retail outlets that have had consistently good performance even over the last few uncertain years: Next and John Lewis.

Both combine e-commerce and a High Street presence, but crucially, both have introduced a hybrid system, click and collect, where customers can order online but pick up their order in a store.

It will be interesting to see how the online retailers overcome the issue of returns.

Plainly High Street retail is not dead yet.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Cash Flow & Forecasting General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery

Are we brewing another bubble?

Profits are up at Currys, PC World and Asda.  Outgoing Bank of England Governor Sir Mervyn King has revised upwards the bank’s growth forecast for the year and the CBI too is a bit more optimistic about “more balanced growth” in the economy.
Add to this, results from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors’ latest survey showing that house buying enquiries had reached their highest level for three years and in April the Ernst & Young ITEM Club predicting a pick up in the housing market activity to almost pre-2007 levels.
Some would argue that Chancellor Osborne’s Funding for Lending and Help to Buy schemes are finally helping potential home buyers but let’s not get carried away here.
Was it not unwise lending on housing that led to the unsustainable property bubble that precipitated the 2008 economic meltdown?
Despite the unseasonably chilly May are these reliable signs of green shoots?
Or are we collectively clutching at short term straws?
We should remember that banks are still weighted down by illiquid assets such as commercial property, investors continue to seek short term gain rather than investing in the longer term future and politicians think only in career terms of keeping their seats in the next election.
Clutching at short term straws will not fix our economic problems. Investing in the longer term, in promising new companies, in support for R & D to keep our knowledge economy competitive overseas and investing in a sensible education and business support policy that provides the skilled workers for the future through apprenticeships just might give the economy a fighting chance.
In the meantime while it’s a bit early for SMEs to shift their focus away from managing cash flow it might be appropriate to revisit the business plan and model to identify any changes that should be made to prepare to take advantage of growth should it materialise.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Quarter Day Rent claims its first major scalp of 2013

K2 Business Rescue asked in a pre-Christmas blog whether January would see a rise of retail insolvencies given the December 25 quarter day rent falling due.
It may be too early to expect a flood but today’s announcement that the High Street camera chain Jessups has gone into administration with PWC as appointed administrators may be first sign. 
Jessups, which in 2009 managed to avoid administration by arranging a debt for equity swap with lender HSBC, saw a significant decline in market share throughout 2012. 
The company has 192 UK stores employing around 2,000 people and the administrators have said that inevitably some stores will have to close given the current ongoing economic crisis. 
Despite the balance sheet restructuring in 2009, Jessups is an example of a company that did not change its business model. As a long established retailer  they continued to rely on high street sales while its market and customers buying behaviour changed. 
Financial restructuring rarely works unless it is part of a strategic review which normally results in a change of business model and an associated operational reorganisation. 
The question is if companies that are currently hanging on by their fingernails do not take action and call in an experienced rescue and turnaround practitioner who will be next?
 

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting General Interim Management & Executive Support Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Build a Flexible Business Model to Ensure Perpetual Survival

While businesses might be concerned about a eurozone Armageddon, whatever the outcome they will need to ensure survival for the period of austerity that is likely to characterise the next decade.
Although growth is desirable, and has been the purpose for many businesses, a more realistic objective in times of uncertainty is to stay in business for the next five years.
Arguably the best way to achieve perpetual business survival is to avoid running out of cash. This involves examining all cash commitments and where possible turning fixed costs into variable ones so as to reduce the breakeven level of sales necessary to cover overheads and fixed obligations.
Long-term fixed obligations include fixed-term rents, hire-purchase or lease agreements, repaying loans, servicing interest, supply contracts and staff employment. Common examples of where companies have taken on such commitments tend to relate to: offices, plant and machinery, IT equipment and software, vehicles, signage, furniture, printers and photocopiers, mobile phones and telephone systems.
Most companies also fail to cancel or at least review contracts that automatically renew, such as: IT equipment and plant leases, life insurance, medical policies, employee benefits, subscriptions and membership, servicing and maintenance, office and window cleaning, sanitary towel and waste removal, portable appliance testing (PAT), health, safety and fire extinguisher inspections and so much more.
The key message is to review every payment and check whether it is necessary and you are not being overcharged.
While it sounds counter-intuitive, businesses often make more money by reducing sales. It is worth looking at the quality of contracts and the quality of customers. The benefits from focusing on only those contracts and customers that provide an adequate profit, that pay well and pay on time can be considerable.  Gross profit margins are increased, overheads are reduced by not having to chase payment and less cash is needed to fund pre-sale payments and post-sale credit. The flexible business model means that you no longer need to take on unprofitable work.
All too many companies are too focussed on chasing sales (and tails) to review costs and find ways to reduce them so reviews should also look at other ways to cut spending. Huge savings can be made on travel and communications costs by using internet-based phone and video conferencing facilities like Skype or VOIP services, for example.
The flexible business model is based on a principle of not having to pay out cash if there is no cash coming in. It needs leadership and teamwork but a focus on improving profitability, on reducing costs and on converting fixed overheads into variable ones means that a business can achieve perpetual survival.

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Business Development & Marketing General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

The Roller-coaster That is Magazine Publishing

The magazine publishing industry has been on a roller coaster ride for many years as print advertising revenues have plummeted, driven partly by a shift to online advertising but more recently by the drop in marketing budgets during the ongoing economic crisis.
This year alone, Sky has discontinued all its magazine titles, each of which had a circulation of £4 million. BBC Worldwide has sold 34 titles to a private equity company. Future UK closed eight titles in July, citing a decline in revenues particularly in the US, and the UK-based B to B publisher Schofield closed its US operation completely, allegedly because the US division’s bank withdrew its finance.
Publishers have been suffering from a triple whammy, of diminished advertising revenue, increased newsprint and ink costs, while simultaneously trying to service residual debt taken on during the good times. 
Yet some publishers remain up beat. London-based B to B publisher Centaur Media has announced that it will double the size of the business in three years by focusing on buying up exciting new businesses, paid-for subscription services and events. Centaur restructured into three divisions in June and says that by 2014 it will double its revenue, the proportion of money it makes from online media and its operating margins. It also plans to reduce its reliance on advertising and shrink the contribution of printed media from 43 percent to 16 percent.
The question is whether it will succeed. We know of one publishing company currently going through a restructure that had been growing over the last two years.  It has a defined circulation B to B market with publications funded by advertising revenue. However, despite its current profitability it is carrying huge liabilities built up over two years of loss making while the business was growing. The sad fact is that this publishing company was undercapitalised and as a result its suppliers have funded its growth and are now exposed as unsecured creditors.
The raises the issue of growing liabilities in an industry where revenue is declining and supplier costs are rising. The potential for a publishing house to drag a lot of suppliers down with it is huge. Restructuring such companies is also difficult since cutting editorial costs has an impact on quality and relevance to readers.
Clearly the industry will need to be much more innovative if it is to survive and prosper. One obvious tactic, as illustrated by Centaur, is to shift some titles to being online only.  Others are making some online sections accessible by subscription only and charging for special reports and in-depth industry information. Other innovations could include experimenting with outsourcing writing overseas, outsourcing sub editing and page make up and printing abroad.
Readex, which regularly surveys attitudes among B to B readers recently reported that 74% wished to carry on using print versions of the titles they read so there is plainly life in the B to B publication market. Professionals will always need to keep up to date with their industry’s developments and the activities of competitors.
Nevertheless, the print side of the industry is likely to decline. Publishers will need to be more innovative and change their business model, most likely embracing alternative media that does not rely on printing and physical distribution.

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery

Saving the High Street

Retail pain continues with the news that Mothercare is to close a third of its 373 UK stores.
JJB Sports has just announced losses 0f £181.4 million for the year to 30 January 2011, three times the previous year’s loss of £68.6 million and plan to close 89 of their 247 stores over the next two years.
And HMV has just had to sell Waterstone’s for £53 million to pay down some of its £170 million of debt. In addition, they also propose to close 40 stores.
Oddbin’s too, has gone like most other wine retail chains, following its failed attempt to agree a restructuring plan with creditors, which was rejected by HMRC.
Plainly there is a major earthquake taking place on the High Street, and it is not all about cutbacks in consumer spending. More importantly retail purchasing is changing. Consumers are becoming sharper shoppers by looking elsewhere, not just in the High Street.  They are visiting dedicated retail parks combining shopping and leisure to offer an experience, entertainment and convenience in one place and are also increasing their online spending.
The government has recently asked Mary ‘Queen of Shops’ Portas to take a look at the country’s High Streets and come up with suggestions for rescuing them, clearly hoping to find a way of rejuvenating this part of the UK economy.
She may well conclude that the competition from shopping and leisure centres with their easy access via car and public transport is too much and that the High Street can survive but only if it offers something different.
Locals still like to buy from local shops that provide a personal service, ideally selling local produce such as farm-sourced. This ought to support retailers like the grocer who lets you taste a piece of cheese before you buy, independent butchers who will advise, trim or even marinate meat and local bakers. Pubs, restaurants and cafes that cater for families, young people, the elderly all play their part in supporting community, even the self-help run library. But for the High Street to avoid further decline, everyone needs to work together and this will require leadership.
You never know, the High Street may be once again be a place where shopping is an enjoyable experience, but what will it look like?

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General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs

First decline in household income for 30 years causes pain on the High Street

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported recently that in 2010 real household disposable income fell by 0.8%, its first drop since 1977.
A plethora of profit warnings from major high street retailers is therefore no surprise. JJB successfully agreed a new Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) for repaying debt, just two years after its last one. Oddbins’ attempts to agree a CVA were rejected which led to it going into administration.
Meanwhile travel company Thomas Cook announced a 6% fall in holiday bookings from the UK. Dixons announced that it was cutting capital expenditure by 25%. H Samuel and Ernest Jones, Argos and Comet all report falling sales. Mothercare is to close a third of its 373 UK stores and HMV has just sold Waterstones for £53 million to pay down some of its £170 million of debt.
Falling consumer confidence, the Government’s austerity measures and rising commodity prices have led to a steady erosion of disposable income. An April report indicated an increase in retail sales, up 0.2% on February’s, but this was attributed to non-store (internet) and small store sales and probably conceals a continued decline in High Street sales.
After a few years of expansion fuelled by debt, it is entirely logical that the marketplace is now facing a sharp contraction as consumers spend less money while they are concerned about their job security and repaying their huge levels of personal debt.
Many companies need to contract and reduce their cost base if they are to survive. For the High Street retailers this means concentrating on profitable stores and reviewing strategy.
Growth is likely to involve developing experience based retail outlets in dedicated shopping environments or direct sales such as online. The High Street has failed to reinvent itself and the recession has accelerated its decline.

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General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

The Current Conundrum Over Inflation and Interest Rates

The most recent inflation rates show that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) has risen to 4%, a surprise drop of 0.4% from February and the Retail Price Index (RPI) to 5.3%, also a fraction less than February’s 5.5%.
If times were normal these figures would nevertheless trigger a rise in the interest rate to 7 % to 8%, about 2.5% above the RPI.
However, times are still clearly not normal following the financial “tsunami” that was the 2008 Great Recession. Many businesses are still struggling to survive and grow in the face of reduced spending by consumers and clients and cope with soaring materials and commodity prices and volatile oil prices because of uncertainty over events in North Africa and the Middle East.
As a result the fear that an interest rate rise might push the economy back into a recession has led to interest rates being decoupled from inflation.  Inflation is a form of currency devaluation.  It means that every £1 buys less than it did when inflation was lower.  Interest rate rises help to correct this. 
I would argue that currently many businesses are operating with huge levels of debt and not doing all they could to reduce even though they can only survive because interest rates are currently so low.  But this current situation is only temporary.
While a viable business should be able to build a surplus of cash in this situation to provide itself with a cushion once interest rates start to rise again, a business in difficulty will not have this option. It therefore needs to think ahead and revamp the business model and restructure to survive and be ready for to what will happen when things are more “normal”.

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Business Development & Marketing Cash Flow & Forecasting General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

How Many High Street Names Will Survive to the End of 2011?

Traditionally UK retailers expect sales in the fourth quarter of the year(Q4) to be significantly boosted by pre-Christmas shopping and by year end sales.
However, according to figures released on January 21 by the Office for National Statistics retail sales volumes dropped 0.8% in December compared with November. It was said to be the weakest annual performance for any December since records began in 1988.
Among those that have already reported sales drops are Clinton Cards, with sales down by 2.1% in the last five weeks of the year, and Mothercare posting a drop of 4%. HMV reported falls in December sales of 10% in the UK and 13.6% in Ireland and issued a profit warning.  Next said it had lost £22 million in Christmas sales.
Many blamed the three weeks of December snow that seized up the UK’s transport system and even online shopping options were no help because many distribution services were unable to guarantee pre-Christmas deliveries.
Sainsbury’s, however, reported sales up 10.1% for the four weeks to December 25, compared with the same period in 2009.
The Q4 figures and further retail results may show that there has been some late-December cheer as consumers rushed to beat the January 4 VAT increase, from 17.5% to 20%.
But it is looking as if the end of year boost the retail sector traditionally relies on may not have quite materialised for most and may have left them less well placed to face the difficult trading conditions expected in 2011.
The most difficult issue facing retailers will be maintaining their profit margins. Margins may have been propped up in December-January by the rush to beat the VAT increase, especially on the larger items but commodity prices on basics like cotton, wheat, rice, maize and sugar are expected to continue to rise thanks to global financial speculation.
Without a fundamental examination of the business, cost cutting (wages, premises,  equipment etc) may not be sufficient for survival in current conditions.
Perhaps a high street retail presence is no longer sustainable and more fundamental and innovative solutions, such as moving the emphasis to online selling, may be the only way some retailers can survive.

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General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Is Your Business Structure Holding Back Your Success?

The structure of a business is crucial to its success and often it can get in the way of growth.
If a business needs to build another factory, say, then if the funding is not in place to do so that will get in the way of growth. This should be factored into the business model.
Often, in order to correct this kind of issue a business needs to be restructured to give itself the flexibility it might need to survive and grow.
Ideally a regular look at the business structure would be part of the process of continuous improvement to ensure a business is in the best possible shape to meet short term problems,  like an economic downturn and a consequent drop in orders, and to enable it to thrive, grow and expand long term.
Restructuring more often is carried out as a consequence of a business struggling to survive and is one of the tools available to business rescue advisers called in to help a company in difficulties.
An example of what a restructuring adviser can do is the case of a company K2 was involved with that had a break-even point of £3.5 million and whose turnover had declined from £5 million to less than £2.5 million.
In this situation it was clear that, although viable, significant changes were needed. They included closing a factory, getting rid of onerous financial arrangements, terminating some employment contracts and reducing other fixed costs.  The outcome of these actions was to reduce the break-even point to £1.8 million.
A reduction of sales to just under £2.5 million then became a healthy profit rather than a significant loss.
It meant that the unit cost of production was also reduced once it was free of the burden of the finance drain on the equipment.
It might seem that this should have been obvious to those running the company, but it is possible to be too intimately involved in the day to day running of a business, especially one under this kind of stress, and to be unable, therefore to stand back and look at the elements in the structure of the business that are impeding a solution to its changed circumstances.

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Business Development & Marketing General Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Survival sometimes needs Fundamental Change

Any successful business would be expected to be constantly monitoring its activities and modifying them where necessary to improve the efficiency and its various offers.
Continuous business improvement does two things: it optimises existing processes and keeps them optimal by continually updating them. 
But on its own, especially when there are significant challenges in the wider economy, such as the current global economic downturn, continuous improvement may not be enough.
Such unexpected challenges can plunge a business into difficulties where its survival may be at stake and this may mean looking at a fundamental change to the way it operates.
Too often businesses struggling to survive, are characterised by hard work and trying to improve the existing business model before they fail.  Business improvement is all about laying foundations, tweaking the system and improving. 
In my view fundamental change is a more radical look at the whole operation but it also needs care to avoid throwing the baby out with the bathwater by looking hard at the business and what needs to be preserved in order to survive and grow in the future. However, if a business tries to grow before bedding in new foundations following fundamental change it will reinforce problems that had not been sorted out.
For example in a downturn it is an understandable reaction for a business to trim its costs when it may be better to have an in-depth look at its business model and be open to more radical changes.
This can all seem too much when a company’s directors are struggling to keep a business afloat at a difficult time.  It is possible to be too close to the problem, however, and a combination of worry and a sense of urgency is not ideal for taking an objective look at the whole business model.
This is where calling on a business turnaround adviser could make all the difference between success and failure.  The adviser is motivated to help a business succeed and will expect to work with committed managers and staff, but they are not so immersed in the day to day minutiae of the operation and can therefore look at all aspects of the business, identify what is viable, what processes are draining the company and what actions can be taken.

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General HM Revenue & Customs, VAT & PAYE Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs Winding Up Petitions

Employing Restructuring Advisers to Help Save Your Company

There are a number of options for companies who find themselves in financial difficulties, but a real challenge is finding someone to help.
It’s made more difficult if the directors/owners take the view that they know their business better than anyone else and infer from this that if they don’t know the solution, then no one else will.
A second issue is trying to solve the situation alone, via a self-help route.  It may be that research has revealed a number of options and in a situation of financial difficulty there is a temptation to latch onto the cheapest or first solution. Indeed, you are likely to think you can’t afford help and as a result persuade yourself that the cheap solution is the right one. It is no surprise that a lot of companies fail having not sought any advice.
In either situation eventually a squeeze on cash flow or pressure from creditors tends to be the catalyst that galvanises action and you are likely to start looking for a solution.
Who do you turn to for help when feeling as boxed in as this?  What’s needed is a business rescue adviser, but how do you go about the process of finding one from among the insolvency, turnaround, accounting and consultancy advisers?  
Carry out a thorough vetting process to confirm they have suitable experience and offer a rescue process rather than selling only one rescue solution. The rescue process should involve a thorough business review to identify a viable business that can emerge from the process, then developing and implementing an operational reorganisation and financial restructuring plan. One aspect of the financial restructuring plan will be how to deal with all the company’s liabilities.
In addition to bank and trade creditors a key creditor is likely to be the HMRC (Her Majesty’s Customs and Excise). Too often companies are advised to enter a Time to Pay arrangement with the HMRC to deal with tax, VAT or PAYE arrears or to enter a Company Voluntary Agreement (CVA) to deal with debts without a realistic assessment of the other demands on the company’s cash.
The first thing to find out, therefore, is whether the adviser is selling something or has a vested interest in the company pursuing a particular solution. Having established they are truly independent, the adviser will conduct a review to establish the core issues.
Support from business rescue advisers with broad commercial experience, not just insolvency, will help manage the process while at the same time helping find a realistic solution.