How should a business in difficulty choose a turnaround or insolvency adviser?

trusted advisorAll too often directors can feel overwhelmed by the problems they have to confront when their business is in difficulties.

In fact, they may have been hoping the problem will resolve itself for some time, while instead the situation has escalated to a crisis point.

However the problem has arisen, the result is often a shortage of cash and the knock-on problem of not being able to meet payroll, buy supplies or pay creditors. This is where the early intervention of a trusted expert can be crucial to business survival.

Calling in a turnaround or insolvency advisor to look at the whole operation, not just the finances, is essential as their independence will mean any recommendations are honest and impartial.

The questions to ask when choosing an advisor

Advisors may not come cheap, but there is a good reason for this.  The best advisors have a breadth of knowledge and experience across a range of disciplines.  While the most obvious and pressing problems may be insufficient cash and impatient creditors, the right advisers will look for and advise on overall solutions for the business that may involve operational reorganisation, not just a short-term financial fix.

In the course of their investigations and subsequent work to save the business the advisor may have to cover financial analysis of statutory accounts, cash flow forecasts and be able to forecast trends. They will need to understand legal compliance requirements with HR and employment, especially if staff are to be made redundant as a means of saving the business.  If they have run their own business so much the better as they will understand your own anxieties.

They should be able to identify viable parts of the business with potential for growth and be able to negotiate with clients, creditors, employees and union representatives, suppliers, HMRC, banks and if relevant insolvency practitioners, who often represent banks.

Advisors often need to deal with Winding Up Petitions, attempts of seizure of assets by Bailiffs or High Court Enforcement Officers and other action by creditors. This requires them to know the different procedures and the legal options for dealing with them.

Professional qualifications, a track record in saving businesses and people skills are all aspects of restructuring work that directors would be advised to explore when choosing the right advisor. Being aware of the difference between different types of adviser may also help since insolvency practitioners generally work for creditors while turnaround professionals work for companies.

It goes without saying that some companies cannot be saved but with the input of objective and impartial advice from the right advisor, there are normally myriad options for saving most of, or at least part of, a business.

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