What is AIM and is it beneficial to SMEs to apply for AIM listing?

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aim for growing businessIt is coming up to 25 years since AIM (Alternative Investments Market), the London Stock Exchange’s junior stock market, was launched and it now lists around 3,600 businesses.
According to the accounting firm BDO, “AIM is the most successful growth market of its type in the world” and in the last five years AIM-listed businesses “have created an additional 76% jobs, now employing almost 390,000 people”.
The London Stock Exchange website explains that AIM is targeted at smaller, and growing, businesses and offers them “the benefits of a world-class public market within a regulatory environment designed specifically to meet their needs”.
It is a multilateral trading facility, operated and regulated by the London Stock Exchange under FCA rules.
Candidates for AIM listing do not have to have a trading track record, but they must abide by the rules. There are very clear guidelines on how to apply for AIM listing on the Stock Exchange website.
They must appoint and maintain an AIM approved Nominated Advisor, also known as a NOMAD, who is responsible to the Exchange for assessing the appropriateness of an applicant for AIM. The NOMAD also advises and guides their client through the AIM listing process and once listed ensures it complies with its ongoing responsibilities.
The Stock Exchange will suspend trading of the company if it ceases to retain a nominated advisor and if a new NOMAD is not appointed within a month, its AIM listing is cancelled and its shares can no longer be publicly bought or sold.
Albeit with advice from a NOMAD, application for AIM listing is relatively straightforward but listing does cost an estimated £400,000 to £600,000 a year. This covers the NOMAD and other adviser and broker fees, plus AIM membership at around £100,000 per year, according to the website startups.co.uk.
Startups lists some of the pros and cons of AIM listing, the main advantage being future access to raising further funds after the IPO (Initial Public Offering). It says, “AIM listing is being seen as an increasingly attractive investment class to institutions such as pension funds”.
“It also raises the profile of a business, as does having Plc status”, it says. While Plc status requires a minimum of £50,000 share capital, AIM companies tend to have much more and there is the attraction of having publicly tradeable shares.
The downsides according to Startups, are not only the financial cost but also the difference between running a Plc as opposed to a privately-owned business, plus the business will be vulnerable to the ups and downs of share values.
I would add another downside, the need to make public disclosures about matters that influence the share price. This may be great when an AIM company is doing well but can be disastrous for one that isn’t, especially one that needs restructuring.