High Court ruling on mis-sold IRS gives businessman the right to sue RBS

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As time goes on more and more murky behaviour by the banks in their treatment of SMEs over Interest Rate Swaps (IRS) is being revealed.

It has been two years since the lobbying group Bully Banks first highlighted IRS mis-selling (IRS are also sometimes referred to as Interest Rate Hedging Products- IRHPs).

As a result of their efforts, and the Tomlinson report into the behaviour of RBS, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has been tasked with investigating the banks’ behaviour and administering a redress scheme to allow SMEs to reclaim their money.

Now a High Court ruling has given one businessman, Michael Hockin the right to sue RBS over a mis-sold IRS, even though the bank put his business into administration in a classic illustration of the behaviour highlighted by Tomlinson.

The company, London and Westcountry Estates, had had a loan that RBS converted to a 10-year IRS, adding an estimated £600,000 extra in annual repayments and an exit fee of £11 million that Mr Hockin said the family was never warned about.

One of the questions that needs to be asked is why the administrators of this once-prosperous business, Ernst & Young, did not pursue a claim against RBS over alleged mis-selling.

RBS meanwhile is quoted as saying that it had investigated Mr Hockin’s concern about mis-selling and found no evidence of wrongdoing by the bank

The case will now be heard in court. Hopefully the issue of why the administrators declined to pursue the bank will be given an airing.