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Banks, Lenders & Investors General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Why HMV may just survive while other high street retailers crash and burn

Despite the continuing carnage on the High Street there are glimmers of hope emerging from the restructuring process currently being carried out on the music store HMV.
Why? Well as with any business restructuring the first step is to carry out a review which includes a thorough look at the accounts to identify any areas where savings can be made, the most obvious in this case being loss-making stores, onerous rental agreements and  the employment roll.
Already the closure of 66 loss-making stores has been announced, plus a further 37 this week, and also administrators Deloitte have noted that landlords have been generally “flexible and supportive” during the ongoing efforts to restructure the business.
Most significant, however, may be the recent announcement that trading agreements for the supply of new stock have been signed with the majority of HMV’s suppliers, something that is generally unusual when a company is in difficulties.
It is clear that HMV’s business model needs to change to take account of the shift in consumer behaviour and deal with intense competition for the sale of music, DVDs and games from online suppliers, digital downloads and also from supermarkets.
HMV however has support from a record industry, particularly the independent labels, which is keen to maintain a High Street presence and can learn from other retailers that justify their High Street presence by providing consumers with a retail experience rather than just a place to purchase goods.
Artists, too, have expressed support with Elton John suggesting holding live gigs in the stores.
The secret is in the details. Customers have been quoted as saying they valued the opportunity to browse, to talk to knowledgeable experts when they are searching for unusual and niche items and to have a sample listen to tracks before they buy. With appropriate staff training, these could provide a USP for the retail arm of the business to highlight.
All this illustrates that a thorough business restructuring involves attention to detail and identifying those aspects that make it special or unique and that may just help it to survive by returning focus to core strengths that may have been lost sight of over time.

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Banks, Lenders & Investors Cash Flow & Forecasting General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround Voluntary Arrangements - CVAs

Insolvency does not have to be the end of your business

When an SME encounters cash flow difficulties and cannot pay its bills many owners assume that their business is bust and should close.
It does not have to be the case. If the core of the business of a company is offering a genuinely useful and saleable product or service, it can normally be saved.
A detailed look at cash flow and accounts is the first step in the process of turning around a struggling business although this needs the help of a business doctor plus commitment, realism and honesty on the part of its owners.
The business doctor will help to identify the profitable activities that should be saved and also has a number of techniques in the toolbox to help deal with the pressing debts that impact on cash flow.
An increasingly useful tool provides a way of dealing with debt by reaching agreement with creditors to repay all or part of the debt in an affordable way that allows the business to focus on building its strengths for the future.
This is a Company Voluntary Arrangement also referred to as a CVA.  The CVA is a binding, formal agreement that is agreed with creditors but needs the help of a business doctor or turnaround adviser. To find out more, K2 Business Rescue has published a useful guide to the steps that need to be taken: K2 CVA Guide 2013. A copy along with other useful guides is available as a free download via the Resources section on the K2 website.

Categories
Banks, Lenders & Investors General Insolvency Rescue, Restructuring & Recovery Turnaround

Frozen panic could become a self-fulfilling prophecy

The latest quarterly survey carried out by the insurance giant Zurich found that 16% of the British small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) surveyed considered themselves at high risk of going out of business within the next year due to financial pressures.
Those perceiving themselves to be most at risk were SMEs in the Retail (21%), Construction (37%) and IT (24%) sectors. In all three the fear of going out of business had risen since the last Zurich quarterly survey.
However, it must be stressed that the survey is a record of the perceptions of SMEs.
More important, perhaps, is that almost 100% of them are not getting any help in dealing with their problems. Despite the latest government lending scheme, Funding for Lending, the banks continue to shun the SME sector as the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) repeatedly highlights.
Just as important, is that most of them are not seeking help in dealing with their problems. Despite the perceived concerns of SMEs, they are not speaking to business advisers who remain quiet. Indeed insolvencies are at their lowest level for 30 years.
But again, perception plays a part but the insolvency statistics are a matter of fact.
Firstly there is the common view among SMEs that if they can’t see a solution then how can an “outsider”. Secondly, too often SMEs don’t know where to go for help and thirdly, they assume that it will cost them money they can’t afford to get help.
The danger is that the fear of going out of business then becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, when with the help of a business doctor or turnaround advisor owners could save the business that has taken them years of hard work to build. Just a free consultation may be all that is needed, and most business doctors will provide some free support. It’s good business for all concerned.